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Who We Are

DSCA is the Department’s lead agency for the execution of Security Cooperation programs. DSCA subject-matter expertise spans the gamut of Security Cooperation activities to include policy, financial, legal, legislative, programmatic, and weapons systems experts.

 

 

What We Do

  • Defense Trade & Arms Transfers

    The transfer of defense articles and services via sale, lease or grant, in furtherance of national security and foreign policy objectives. This includes the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program as well as other programs specifically designed to address and expedite international partners’ urgent or emerging requirements or capability gaps

  • Defense Institution Building

    Designed to help international partners establish responsible defense governance to build effective, transparent, and accountable defense institutions

  • International Education & Training

    Academic and professional military education for partner countries at DoD Institutions

  • Humanitarian Assistance, Disaster Relief, & Mine Action

    Building the capacity of partner nation civilian and military institutions to provide essential services to civilian populations through civil-military engagement

     

Leadership

The DSCA leadership team oversees a dynamic workforce spanning expertise across the Security Cooperation (SC) spectrum.  Under the leadership of the DSCA Director, Vice Admiral Joseph Rixey and the Deputy Director, Ms. Jennifer Zakriski, DSCA’s Principal Directors are working to fulfill the goals and objectives laid out in DSCA’s strategic plan, Vision 2020.  Focused on continued process improvements of a diverse portfolio of security assistance and partner capacity building programs, DSCA’s Principal Directors lead their organizations in the assessment and implementation of SC processes, procedures, and policies across the SC community.  They provide staff resources to the Integrated Regional Teams for execution of the day-to-day requirements of the SC mission.

 

 

Introductory Video

 

News and Media




02
Feb
2016
On Thursday, January 28, Ambassador Michael D. Kirby will attend a donation ceremony at the Serbian... (More)
17
Nov
2015
The White House For Immediate Release November 17, 2015 Manila Harbor Manila,... (More)
17
Nov
2015
www.af.mil SOTO CANO AIR BASE, Honduras (AFNS) -- A C-5 Galaxy delivered 23,415 pounds of... (More)
26
May
2016
~Defense Security Cooperation Agency NEWS RELEASE On the web: http://www.dsca.mil Media/Public... (More)
26
May
2016
WASHINGTON, May 26, 2016 - The State Department has made a determination approving a possible... (More)
26
May
2016
WASHINGTON, May 26, 2016 - The State Department has made a determination approving a possible... (More)
 

Customer Guide

The purpose of this guide is to provide you, the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customer, with a simplified overview of the process the United States (U.S.) uses to transfer defense articles and/or services from the U.S. to a friendly foreign governments or to specific international organizations.

 

 

SAMM

DSCA 5105.38-M, the Security Assistance Management Manual, is the primary document through which DSCA directs, administers, and provides DoD-wide guidance to the DoD Components and DoD representatives to U.S. missions for the execution of DoD security cooperation programs.

 

 

More On FMS

The FMS program is the primary means by which the U.S. Government sells defense articles, services, and training to partners. It allows partner nations to purchase defense articles and services, as well as design and construction services, from the U.S. Government.

 

FMS is operated on a “no-profit” and “no-loss” basis to the U.S. Government. Through the FMS program, the DoD procures defense articles and services for partner nations using the same acquisition process used to procure for its own military needs. The purchaser benefits from DoD technical and operational expertise, existing procurement infrastructure, transparent purchasing practices, and the lower unit costs that can result when the DoD is able to combine a partner’s procurement with one of its own.